ETL401 Blog Tasks

PART B ASSIGNMENT 2: CRITICAL REFLECTION

Prior to commencing ETL401 Miss Lizzie’s view of the teacher librarian was largely based on interactions with and observations of teacher librarians with whom she had worked.  These views are reflected in the New South Wales Department of School Education’s [NSW DSE, 1996] teacher librarian role statement (cited in Miss Lizzie 2013a).  So, her perception of the role was:

·        assisting teachers and students to design and implement research projects presented in print or PowerPoint format;

·        teaching information skills;

·        providing resources for teaching and learning;

·        exposing students to quality literature;

·        promoting reading;

·        ordering and covering books;

·        acquiring teacher resources;

·        shelving books;

·        managing student library monitors;

·        organising displays during book week.  

Miss Lizzie’s view of the role of teacher librarian whilst accurate in some ways, presented a shallow understanding of the professional knowledge, skills and commitment required to perform at a level of excellence.  Her lack of awareness was particularly pronounced in understanding:

·        the complex concept of information literacy (IL), how it is developed in students and its role in lifelong learning;

·        the responsibility and leadership required to promote and coordinate  a whole school focus in information literacy policy and implementation;

·        the role as technology specialist in information and communication technologies (ICTs), web sites, web 2.0 tools, online curation tools, software and hardware and how to use them in teaching and learning;

·        the expectation and value of engaging with professional literature and the community of teacher librarians for continuing professional development in the use of best practice;

·        evidence based practice and its role in promoting and justifying the work of the teacher librarian and informing best practice;

·        the provision of high quality resources accessible to all students regardless of reading level, learning style or disability 

On March 21 Miss Lizzie (2013a, para. 5) demonstrated the beginning of understanding the librarian’s role in “leadership, professional involvement and development, promotion of the library and innovation.”  However, there is little or no awareness of the role of evidence based practice, information literacy, digital technology and tools, the provision of high quality resources, equipping students for lifelong learning, or what “professional involvement and development” actually means (Miss Lizzie, 2013a, para. 5), despite exposure to ASLA’s (2004) Standards of professional excellence for teacher librarians

However, by March 22 Miss Lizzie (2013b, para. 4) demonstrates awareness of the teacher librarian as “information specialist and technology expert” and of lifelong learning through analysis of Herring (2007), Lamb (2011), Purcell (2010) and Valenza (2010).  A stronger awareness of the role as leader in teaching the inquiry process to both teachers and students is emerging (Miss Lizzie, 2013c).  At this stage Miss Lizzie believes that the role of teacher comes before the role of leader because “a leader must first have the skills and knowledge in programming, curriculum development, teaching strategies, classroom management, behaviour theory, information literacy, technology and so on in order to be able to develop (these) skills in others” (2013b, para. 9-10).  She decided the way to create change is to “devise a library policy and plan, present it to the school leadership team and staff to discuss a change in culture and thinking about the library, the librarian and what can be offered or achieved by working collaboratively to improve student skills in information literacy and information technology” (Miss Lizzie, 2013b, para. 8). 

However, on May 8, 2013 after readings regarding collaborative planning and teaching, Miss Lizzie  (2013n) now believes it is better to start with small changes.  Start by collaborating with one or a small group of teachers to teach information literacy through guided inquiry, to build a change in culture.  Use data from evidence based practice and teacher advocacy to demonstrate the effectiveness of library programs, then a whole school approach to the development of information literacy can eventually be established along with principal support (Hay & Todd cited in Magner, 2013b; Hay & Todd cited in Miss Lizzie, 2013d). 

Miss Lizzie’s emerging awareness of the importance of evidence based practice to the role of the teacher librarian was demonstrated in Blog Task 1 – ETL401 (Miss Lizzie, 2013e) and later confirmed and expanded in Assessment 1 – ETL401 (Magner, 2013c).  Evidence based practice is an important and powerful tool for teacher librarians to use in the development of support for library programs and collaborative practice, but most of all for the development of best practice across all areas of library teaching and the provision of services (Todd; Lamb & Johnson, cited in Miss Lizzie, 2013c & 2013e).  

Arguably one of the most important roles of the teacher librarian is to develop information literate students through inquiry learning, project based learning and through the use of an information processing model (Collins et al. cited in Miss Lizzie, 2013f; Callison, Eisenberg, Herring, Kuhlthau & Sheingold cited in Miss Lizzie, 2013h; Miss Lizzie, 2013l; Magner, 2013e).  This view was formed over several weeks of study involving:

·        the complex concept of information literacy, the skills and attributes it comprises as featured in Blog Task 3 – ETL401 (Miss Lizzie, 2013g);

·        Kulhthau’s information processing model and her guided inquiry model (Miss Lizzie, 2013i, & 2013j; Magner, 2013d);

·        the transfer of information literacy practice across different contexts (Herring cited in Miss Lizzie, 2013k); and

·        assessing inquiry learning (Miss Lizzie, 2013m). 

After reflecting on the readings in these areas, especially those with practical examples of implementation such as in Sheerman 2011, Scheffers 2008 and Fitzgerald 2011, Miss Lizzie understood how to develop information literate students who are able to function in and contribute to society in the 21st century, which is ultimately the teacher librarian’s most important role. 

 

References

Australian School Library Association.  (2004).  Standards of professional excellence for teacher librarians.  Retrieved from: http://www.asla.org.au/policy/standards.aspx

Fitzgerald, L.  (2011).  The twin purposes of guided inquiry: Guiding student inquiry and evidence based practice.  Scan, 30 (1), p. 26-41.  Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library.

Herring, J. (2007). Teacher librarians and the school library. In S. Ferguson (Ed.) Libraries in the twenty-first century : charting new directions in information (pp. 27-42). Wagga Wagga, NSW : Centre for Information Studies, Charles Sturt University.

Lamb, A. (2011). Bursting with Potential: Mixing a Media Specialist’s Palette. Techtrends: linking research & practice to improve learning, 55(4), 27-36. doi:10.1007/s11528-011-0509-3.  Retrieved from:  Charles Sturt University Library EbscoHost http://web.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=c64def89-3898-47f4-ac4e-87cf3f408c8e%40sessionmgr11&vid=2&hid=24

Magner, E. (2013a, March 22).  The Role I see Myself Fulfilling in the School as Teacher Librarian [Online forum comment].  Retrieved from http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL401_201330_W_D/page/76dcc6a5-5ca4-4542-0021-bc0bd55b876d

Magner, E. (2013b, March 26).  What is strategic thinking?  [Online forum comment].  Retrieved from http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL401_201330_W_D/page/57a326a0-4f42-4cbe-808d-b3033e63e519

Magner, E. (2013c, April 15). Assessment item 1: Teaching role of the teacher librarian.  Winmalee: Elizabeth Magner

Magner, E. (2013d, April 27). Guided enquiry.  [Online forum comment].  Retrieved from http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL401_201330_W_D/page/a8049058-9750-444e-8054-0966873990f5

Magner, E. (2013e, May 5). The convergence of information literacy and digital literacies.  [Online forum comment].  Retrieved from http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL401_201330_W_D/page/6db26a1a-5e70-42c2-0024-aed54dd1461f

Miss Lizzie. (2013a). School librarian role statement. In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/03/21/school-librarian-role-statement/

Miss Lizzie. (2013b). Compare and contrast the views of Herring, Purcell, Lamb, and Valenza.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/compare-and-contrast-the-views-of-herring-purcell-lamb-and-valenza/

Miss Lizzie. (2013c). The role of the teacher librarian – Forum 2.1.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/the-role-of-the-teacher-librarian-forum-2-1/

Miss Lizzie. (2013d). Making Priorities Clear and Palatable to the School Community – Think Strategically – Forum 2.2. In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/03/26/making-priorities-clear-and-palatable-to-the-school-community-think-strategically-forum-2-2/

Miss Lizzie. (2013e). Evidence Based Practice and the Role of The Teacher Librarian – Blog Task 1 ETL401.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/03/25/evidence-based-practice-and-the-role-of-the-teacher-librarian-blog-post-1-etl401/

Miss Lizzie. (2013f). The teacher librarian and the curriculum.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/the-teacher-librarian-and-the-curriculum/

Miss Lizzie. (2013g). Information literacy is more than a set of skills – ETL401 blog task 3.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/05/13/information-literacy-is-more-than-a-set-of-skills-etl401-blog-task-3/

Miss Lizzie. (2013h). Information search process models.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/04/27/information-search-process-models/

Miss Lizzie. (2013i). Guided enquiry forum 4.1.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/04/27/guided-inquiry-etl-forum-4-1/

Miss Lizzie. (2013j). The role of the teacher librarian in the guided inquiry approach to learning – ETL401 blog task 2.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/the-role-of-the-teacher-librarian-in-the-guided-inquiry-approach-to-learning-etl401-blog-task-2/

Miss Lizzie. (2013k). Assessing information literacy and inquiry learning.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/05/05/information-literacy-and-transfer/

Miss Lizzie. (2013l). The convergence of information literacy and digital literacies – ETL401 forum 4.2.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/05/05/the-convergence-of-information-literacy-and-digital-literacies-etl401-forum-4-2/

Miss Lizzie. (2013m). Assessing information literacy and inquiry learning.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/05/05/assessing-information-literacy-and-inquiry-learning/

Miss Lizzie. (2013n). Collaborative teaching and planning.  In The lively librarian: Learning to create stimulating spaces.  Retrieved from https://thelivelylibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/05/08/collaborative-planning-and-teaching/

 New South Wales Department of Education [NSW DET]. (2007). Information skills in the school: Engaging learners in constructing knowledge (2nd Ed.).  School Libraries and Information Literacy unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate, State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training.  Retrieved from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/teachingideas/isp/docs/infoskills.pdf    

New South Wales Department of School Education.  (1996).   Handbook  for school libraries: Second edition.  New South Wales Department of School Education Curriculum Directorate.

Purcell, M. (2010). All Librarians Do Is Check out Books, Right? A Look at the Roles of a School Library Media Specialist. Library Media Connection, 29(3-), 30-33.  Retrieved from:  Charles Sturt University Library EbscoHost http://web.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=f494ffe1-f549-45bb-91fa-246b7fbe1075%40sessionmgr4&vid=2&hid=24

Scheffers, J. (2008).  Guided inquiry: A learning journey.  In Scan, 27 (4), p.34-42.  Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library.

Sheerman, A. (2011).  Accepting the challenge: Evidence based practice at Broughton Anglican College.  In Scan, 30 (2), p. 24-33.  Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library.

Valenza, J (2010) Manifesto for 21st Century school librarians.  Retrieved from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ 

 

Information Literacy is More Than a Set of Skills

ETL401 Blog Task 3

Information literacy is more than a set of skills.  It is a practice.  Students need to possess a range of skills to be information literate, but they also require the knowledge of when and how to apply these skills in a responsible, ethical, legal and safe way.  These elements combined are required to become an independent, lifelong learner: one that can transfer and apply the practice across different contexts (American Association of School Librarians [AASL], n. d; Metros and Kahne cited in Waters, 2012; and Bundy, 2004).  This has implications for teacher librarians (TLs), who as information specialists must drive the development of information literacy in the students of their school.

Most writers on the subject of information literacy agree on the basic set of skills required to become information literate (Dawson and Kallenberger, 2007).  These include:

·        Defining the question or task

·        Locating information

·        Evaluating information

·        Organising information

·        Presenting information

·        Self-assessment of what was learnt

However, this basic set of information skills does not include equipping students with the other attributes necessary to become information literate in a world where teamwork and proficiency in the use of information communications technologies (ICTs) and their associated tools is expected (Bundy, 2004 and Eisenberg, 2008), as well as knowing when and how to apply them.  Therefore, teacher librarians must model and provide students with opportunities to use a variety of ICTs and Web 2.0 tools effectively during their investigations and presentations.

Teacher librarians must develop students who have the ability to conduct effective internet searches and critically evaluate information by identifying relevant and authoritative sources in any media.  Weak data will result in poor learning and research outcomes (Bundy, 2004).  Acknowledging ideas and sources of information to avoid plagiarism is also important to ensure information is used in a responsible, ethical and legal way (Herring and Tarter cited in Combes, 2013). 

Teacher librarians are not merely teaching a set of skills.  Information literacy means using information effectively to learn, create new knowledge, solve problems and make decisions (Bundy, 2004).  Through inquiry learning (IL) and project-based learning (PBL) students can achieve this by recognising their information needs and progressing through a series of stages to solve problems, which includes analysing and reflecting on their progress and on the process they’re using (Eisenberg, 2008).

Bundy (2004) adds further to the definition of information literacy by including collaboration and communication as important requirements as these are needed in the workplace and can improve student learning outcomes. 

Although there are differences in agreement on the complete set of skills and attributes required by an information literate individual, most agree on the importance of the basic skills as listed above.  Authors also agree that these skills are required to be taught and used across the curriculum, and are required for and lead to lifelong learning (Abilock, 2004; Bundy, 2004; and Langford, 1998).   However, these skills are not enough and to be truly information literate in the 21st century teacher librarians must develop students who:

·        work collaboratively

·        think critically

·        solve problems

·        communicate in different ways using a range of media

·        proficient in the use of ICTs and Web 2.0 tools

·        analyse their work

·        reflect on progress and outcomes

·        understand when and how to apply the appropriate skills

·        evaluate authority and information and its source

·        acknowledge sources of information and ideas correctly

·        use information responsibly, ethically and safely

·        construct their own knowledge through research

·        practice information literacy by applying these skills and attributes to different situations and across different contexts.

References

Abilock, D.  (2004).  Information literacy: An overview of design, process and outcomes.  Retrieved from http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/1over/infolit1.html

American Association of School Librarians [AASL], n. d.  AASL standards for the 21st century learner.  Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/standards

Bundy, A. (Ed.). (2004).  Australian and New Zealand information literacy framework: principals, standards and practice.  2nd ed.  Adelaide: Australian and New Zealand Institute for Information Literacy (ANZIIL) and Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL).  Retrieved from http://www.caul.edu.au/content/upload/files/info-literacy/InfoLiteracyFramework.pdf

Combes, B.  (2013).  Definitions of information literacy [ETL401 Module 4.1].  Retrieved May 13, 2013, from Charles Sturt University website: http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL401_201330_W_D/page/21cc3723-8c2a-4279-008f-96f00ee74642

Dawson, M. & Kallenberger, N. (Eds.).  (2007).  Information skills in the school: Engaging learners in constructing knowledge.  NSW: Department of Education and Training.  Retrieved from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/teachingideas/isp/docs/infoskills.pdf   

Eisenberg, M. B. (2008). Information literacy: Essential skills for the Information Age. Journal of Library & Information Technology, 28(2), 39-47.  Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library.

Langford, L.  (1998).  Information literacy: a clarification.  Retrieved from http://www.fno.org/sept98/clarify.html

Waters, J. K.  (2012). Turning students into good digital citizens.  The journal.  Retrieved from http://thejournal.com/Articles/2012/04/09/Rethinking-digital-citizenship.aspx

The Role of the Teacher Librarian with respect to

The Guided Inquiry Approach

ETL401 Blog Task 2

The role of the teacher librarian is vital to the success of the Guided Inquiry (GI) approach to learning.  As the name suggests, it is the teacher librarian’s role to guide, instruct, model and coach students through a process of inquiry.  The teacher librarian also serves as a resource specialist, interventionist, information literacy teacher, planner and collaborator (Kuhlthau & Maniotes, 2010).  These roles have equal importance because if one area is weak it affects the outcomes of the GI process.

The teacher librarian works collaboratively with other teachers to carefully plan outcomes, objectives, assessments and the unit of work.  This is vital to the success of GI (Sheerman, 2011, p. 26).  Without careful planning and preparation the students are unlikely to achieve outcomes such as developing critical thinking skills, metacognitive skills, the construction of knowledge and other skills for lifelong learning.  The outcomes of GI can be drawn from the five kinds of learning: information literacy; learning how to learn; literacy competence; social skills; and curriculum content including information communications technology (ICT) (Kuhlthau & Maniotes, 2010).

Providing access to appropriate resources at the right time is also a vital role of the teacher librarian as resource specialist. Different kinds of searching occur during the GI process, such as preliminary, exploratory, comprehensive and summary searching.  They all require different kinds of information, which students need to access to be able to construct knowledge, achieve GI outcomes and remain positive toward the process (Fitzgerald, 2011, p. 29). 

The role of resourcing also extends to the selection of appropriate ICT and Web 2.0 tools for students to use during GI and for presenting conclusions.  Students are motivated by the use of Web 2.0 tools such as blogs and wikis, and they play a significant role in communication, assessment and guiding students through the process.  So selecting and incorporating relevant ICT and Web 2.0 tools into GIs is an important role of the teacher librarian (Scheffers, 2008, p. 36-37).

Once the GI has begun the teacher librarian’s role is to guide, instruct, model and coach students through its stages to ensure information literacy and other outcomes are achieved.  The teacher librarian guides students step by step through instructing and modelling what to do, how to do it and why.  Without explicit instruction and time for students to explore and work at each stage thoroughly, the learning will be shallow and superficial.  For example, developing background knowledge is an important part of the process because without it, students experience difficulty developing a focus for their inquiry.  Students need the opportunity and time to build background knowledge and to make connections with prior knowledge.  It is the teacher librarian as facilitator that ensures this occurs and students succeed in the process (Thomas, Crow and Franklin, 2011, p. 43).

Intervention occurs when the teacher librarian observes a student having difficulty with a task and intervenes to provide assistance and emotional support. Assistance enables students to experience progress in carrying out the assigned task, otherwise gaps in understanding can occur which impede a student’s progress and the achievement of outcomes.  Hence, observing and intervening are vital to the role of the teacher librarian in GI.  (Dervin cited in Thomas, Crow and Franklin, 2011, p. 51).

The specialist skills of the teacher librarian allow her to perform the roles of guide, instructor, model, coach, collaborator, program designer, resource and technology provider and intervener.  All these roles are vital to the success of the guided inquiry approach in achieving student outcomes.

 References

Fitzgerald, L.  (2011).  The twin purposes of guided inquiry: Guiding student inquiry and evidence based practice.  Scan, 30 (1), p. 26-41.  Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library.

Kuhlthau, C. C., Maniotes, L. K. & Caspari, A. K. (2013).  Guided inquiry design.  Carol Collier Kuhlthau.  Retrieved from http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~kuhlthau/guided_inquiry_design.htm

Kuhlthau, C. C. & Maniotes, L. K.  (2010). Building guided inquiry teams for 21st-Century learners. School Library Monthly, 26(5), 18.  Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library.

Scheffers, J. (2008).  Guided inquiry: A learning journey.  In Scan, 27 (4), p.34-42.  Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library.

Sheerman, A. (2011).  Accepting the challenge: Evidence based practice at Broughton Anglican College.  In Scan, 30 (2), p. 24-33.  Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library.

Thomas, N. P., Crow, S. R., & Franklin, L. L. (2011). Chapter 3: The Information Search Process: Kuhlthau’s legacy. In Information literacy and information skills instruction: Applying research to practice in the 21st century school library (3rd ed., pp. 33-58). Santa Barbara: Libraries Unlimited. Retrieved from Charles Sturt University Library. 

Evidence Based Practice and the Role of The Teacher Librarian

 – Blog Task 1 ETL401

“The focus of the professional practice of the teacher librarian (TL) revolves around learning outcomes of students – the knowledge, values, and skills that students develop because of school libraries, and the demonstration of these dispositions.”  (Todd, 2007, p.62).

Evidence based practice is the systematic process of documenting and demonstrating how a teacher librarian makes a difference in student learning.  (Lamb & Johnson, 2004-2010b, para. 2).

It is vital to the process of improving student learning outcomes because:

  • it is a reflective practice cycle, that involves measuring the effectiveness of the TL’s program, and using these measures (evidence) to make decisions, to inform and direct future teaching and learning initiatives (Valenza, in Lamb & Johnson, 2004-2010a, para. 23).
  • positive results build support for library programs, (Todd, 2007, p.63), which can lead to greater funding, more collaborative planning and other benefits that positively impact on student learning outcomes (Oberg, 2002, p. 13).

 Forms of Research:

1.      Current Professional Research

TLs must engage with current research on best practice to inform teaching because

“having a deep and explicit knowledge of the complex array of findings, and being able to speak with confidence about how these findings shape your professional practice, and how you utilize these findings … can be powerful platforms for local library interventions and initiatives.”  (Todd, 2007, p. 64).

Research also provides practical insights into how evidence might be gathered, analysed, and utilised to improve student outcomes and to position the school library as central to the learning process.  (Todd, 2007, p. 64).

2.      Gathering Evidence in Your School

Meaningful evidence on the impact of the TL’s instructional role on student outcomes in your school must be gathered.  (Todd, 2003, para. 5)  Strategies can include:

  • Pre- and post- knowledge tests or checklists
  • Rubrics
  • Concept maps
  • Reflection sheets
  • Self-assessment logs
  • Process documentation tasks
  • Survey responses
  • Student products (Todd, 2007, p. 72)
  • Learning journals – student or TL (Todd, 2003, para. 12)

For example, Oberg (2002, p.12) documents a school that found scores on reading standardised tests began to climb as library use increased.  This evidence links student outcomes to library use and programs.

Current professional research, school based evidence, professional expertise and reasoning is combined to devise learning programs and interventions that are effective in improving student outcomes.   (Todd, 2007, p.62).

Communicate Findings

Research must be shared with the school community in order to impact on student learning and your role as TL: include clear details on the scope of the evidence and how it was collected; acknowledge negative or problematic evidence as this may also prove useful in designing initiatives for improvement; and ensure the evidence is easily understood, along with any recommendations.  (Todd, 2007, p.76).

Active support and respect will be gained from principals, teachers and parents by showing them your impact on student learning and how their students benefit from library services.  (Todd, 2003, para. 3-4).  This support and respect, from the principal in particular, can make it easier to:

  • secure a decent budget (Todd, 2003, para. 3).  A positive correlation exists between well-resourced libraries and higher student outcomes.  (Softlink, 2012, p. 2).
  • develop a collaborative school culture and willingness to work with you, which is needed for a strong school library program (Oberg, 2006, p. 16).  “Collaboration is the single professional behaviour of TLs that most affects student achievement.”  (Haycock, 2007, p. 32)
  • continue the cycle of evidence based practice and lead colleagues in the process, which will also enhance students outcomes

Evidence based practice guides daily practice, demonstrates the achievement of outcomes, demands critical reflection of programs, informs the school community and targets areas for improvement.  It is a vital and continuous cycle necessary for targeting improvement in student outcomes and informing TL practice.

References

Haycock, K.  (2007).  Collaboration: Critical Success Factors for Student Learning. School Libraries Worldwide, 13(1), 25-35.  Retrieved from:  Charles Sturt University EbscoHost

Lamb, A. & Johnson, L.  (2004-2010a).  Library media program: Evaluation.  In The school library media specialist.  Retrieved from: http://eduscapes.com/sms/program/evaluation.html

Lamb, A. & Johnson, L.  (2004-2010b).  Library media program: Evidence-based decisionmaking.  In The school library media specialist.  Retrieved from: http://eduscapes.com/sms/program/evidence.html

Oberg, D. (2002). Looking for the evidence: Do school libraries improve student achievement? School Libraries in Canada, 22(2), 10-13+.   Retrieved from: Charles Sturt University Library http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/docview/222527406/fulltextPDF

Oberg, D. (2006). Developing the respect and support of school administrators. Teacher Librarian, 33(3), 13-18. Retrieved from: Charles Sturt University Library http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/docview/224879111/fulltextPDF

Softlink.  (2012).  Australian school library survey 2012.   Softlink Australia.  Retrieved from:  http://www2.softlinkint.com/assets/pdf/survey/2012%20Softlink%20school%20library%20survey%20report.pdf

Todd, R. J.  (2003). Irrefutable evidence:  How to prove you boost student achievement.  In School library journal.  Retrieved from:  http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA287119.html

Todd, R. J. (2007). Evidenced-based practice and school libraries: from advocacy to action. In S. Hughes-Hassell & V. H. Harada School reform and the school library media specialist

(pp. 57-78). Westport, CY: Libraries Unlimited.  Retrieved from: Charles Sturt University Library

Valenza, J. In Lamb, A. & Johnson, L.  (2004-2010a).  Library media program: Evaluation.  In The school library media specialist.  Retrieved from: http://eduscapes.com/sms/program/evaluation.html

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